Marwan Abou-Rass Speaker

PO Box 28722
Los Angeles, CA 91004

(213) 395-9099

mar@abourass.com
www.abourass.com


TOPICS:

  • Clinical
  • Endodontics
  • General Dentistry
  • Hands-On Workshops
  • Oral Surgery
  • Practice Management
  • Prosthodontics

Prof. Marwan Abou-Rass, DDS, MDS, PhD

Dr. Marwan Abou-Rass brings nearly 50 years of teaching cutting-edge innovations in the field of endodontic education.

General practitioners in North America provide 72% of endodontic treatments. But their training does not prepare them for the clinical intricacies of performing simple molar endodontics and re-treatment which are essential clinical skills that every dental graduate should have.

Dr. Abou-Rass is a strong advocate of quality general practitioner education and has traveled the world in pursuit of that objective.


General practitioners in the USA and Canada provide 72% of endodontic treatments. But their training does not prepare them for the clinical intricacies of performing simple endodontic surgery.

In some situations, the appropriate management of technically substandard endodontically treated teeth requires surgical procedures to complete intra-canal treatment and fulfill the optimal clinical and biologic objectives or simply drain a swelling or curette an apical or periradicular lesion.

There are so many endodontic pathologic problems where a simple elevation of a flap will reveal valuable diagnostic and prognostic information. The course is planned to teach the skills necessary to perform basic flap incision and elevation appropriate for endodontic problems, perform dentoalveolar curettage and simple apicoectomy of overfill and retreated endodontic cases which needs endodontic surgery. The availability of magnification with appropriate surgical loupes, anatomically designed microsurgical instruments will facilitate the surgery and achieved the objectives.

Learning Objectives

  • Review the current scope of modern surgical endodontics.
  • Describe endodontic treatment finalization protocol in association with endodontic surgery.
  • Review traditional oral surgery flap designs and their disadvantages when used in endodontic surgery.
  • Review key anatomical structures and how to protect these structures during surgery.
  • Describe pre-surgery patient preparation, quadrant preparation, and tooth preparation.
  • Explore intra-sulcular horizontal and vertical mucoperiosteal flap incisions, flaps elevations and retraction.
  • List the criteria for osseous surgical window and how to prepare it from the pathologic osseous window.
  • Recognize the disadvantages of the traditional apicoectomy and retro-filling surgery.
  • List the criteria of apical curettage and root-end beveling.
  • Describe emergency surgery, including incision and drainage and cortical plate trephination.
  • Describe interim endodontic therapy: A technique for Native Alveolar Bone Regeneration in Preparation for Immediate Implant Placement.
  • Learn how to debride pockets and contour alveolar bone.
  • Describe surgical closure including flap repositioning, flap coaptation and suturing.
  • Discuss intra- and post-surgical complications.
  • Describe post-surgical care.

Suggested Format: 1 or 2 Day, Partial Day, Keynote; Lecture, Demonstration and/or Hands-On Training
Suggested Audience: General Dentist and Specialist; Team Members

Endodontic post errors, such as; stripping, perforations, crack initiation, and crack propagation are caused by the commercial, invasive prefabricated post drills. The drills are not scientifically standardized and do not correlate with root canal anatomy.

The evidence is now settled; there is no significant remaining controversy surrounding best practices in restoring endodontically treated teeth (ETT) or which materials are best to use. This eye-opening session focuses exclusively on the clinical application of best evidence in composite post-and-core build-up techniques for the best possible outcomes in restoring ETT.

Dr. Abou-Rass considers composite post-and-core build-up an integral part of modern endodontic treatment and an essential factor for successful restorative treatment. This approach not only provides the physical foundation for proper restoration, but also prevents the risks of coronal leakage and protects the root canal obturation seal, sterility, and longevity. A well-executed composite postand-core build-up enables dental professionals to place the final restoration of the endodontically treated tooth with the most predictable, trouble-free, permanent, post-and-core foundation.

The course offers an in-depth review of factors, procedures, and practices that reduce teeth resistance to fracture, as well as the factors and conditions that may cause complications or failures of the composite post-and-core build-up.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn the guidelines for the assessment of endodontic treatment as a foundation for the composite post-and-core build-up.
  • Review the clinical guidelines for the assessment of sub-standard endodontic treatment and when to retreat the root canal.
  • Identify the conditions that require post placement in the ETT.
  • List the endodontic and restorative criteria of composite post-and-core build-up.
  • Review of current concept in composite post build, set-up, materials and supplies.
  • Review post cavity preparation designs and methods.
  • The anatomic rational for the 7-8mm post length.
  • Describe how to prepare the pulp chamber walls, floor, and filled root canal orifices for the composite core build-up.
  • Describe how to bond the pulp chamber and the post using incremental, thin, layering of the flowable composite.
  • Review the finishing and temporization procedures.

Suggested Format: 1 or 2 Day, Partial Day, Keynote; Lecture, Demonstration and/or Hands-On Training
Suggested Audience: General Practitioners

When endodontic treatment fails, look for coronal and apical leakage into the main canal as the reason for the problem

The statistics are alarming: The global prevalence of apical lesions with substandard endodontically treated teeth (ETT) is 24%–60%. The documented prevalence of apical lesions in endodontically untreated teeth (EUT) is 1½% – 7%.

The session covers best practices in initial endodontic treatment to ensure the lowest possible rates of retreatment. Designed specifically to close gaps in clinical and procedural training and education, the course clears up the myths and mysteries of endodontic treatment success, covering the most common causes of endodontic treatment failure and how to prevent it.

Most apical endodontic problems are cured by a standard-of-quality initial treatment or retreatment. Few may ever require surgery. In practice, 80% of endodontic treatment failures are attributed to root canal preparation errors. Ledging, stripping, perforating and instrument breakage cause incomplete root filling, dead spaces and apical leakage which are the leading causes of endodontic treatment failure.

Dr. Abou-Rass, global pioneer and renowned educator in the field, covers the most common methods, materials, and clinical practices that result in substandard initial outcomes, cause apical periodontitis formation, or prevent healing. Excessive guttapercha condensation and mechanical compaction generate forces that propagate existing micro-cracks into root line cracks and fractures.

Regardless of the patient signs and symptoms, the radiographic diagnosis of a tooth with poor technical quality endodontic treatment should be considered dental treatment risk factor.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn how to clinically benefit from the historic analysis and review of treatment errors and failures of the silver point treatment era, paste fillers era, and single point gutta-percha methods.
  • Review the clinical and biologic guiding principles for evidence-based and successful endodontic treatment.
  • Describe critical endodontic anatomy.
  • Enumerate the practices that cause technically sub-standardized endodontic treatment outcomes.
  • Define pre-endodontic treatment considerations regarding the patient, the tooth, and the armamentarium setup.
  • Discuss the criteria of acceptable and unacceptable endodontic access preparations.
  • Review best practices in root canal preparation methods.

Suggested Format: 1 or 2 Day, Partial Day, Keynote; Lecture, Demonstration and/or Hands-On Training
Suggested Audience: General Practitioners

As recently as 2012, the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU) a systematic review of the methods of endodontic diagnosis and treatment in endodontics found them to be unscientific and non-evidence based.

The 4R operational diagnosis protocol developed by Professor Marwan Abou-Rass offers clinicians evidence-based guidelines for better diagnosis and treatment planning. With nearly fifty years of teaching experience and leading-edge innovations in the field of endodontic education, Dr. Abou-Rass brings unparalleled expertise to this foundational course in endodontic diagnostics.

Abou-Rass’ 4R operational diagnosis protocol (4ROD) provides clinicians with eight (8) clinical profiles in which the strength of one findings offsets the weakness of the other. To reach a correct diagnosis and treat appropriately, biologically oriented clinicians analyze the anatomic, physiologic, pathologic relationships between the dental pulp, dentin, periodontal and periapical tissues and structures.

Learning Objectives

  • Analyze the accuracy of the intraoral and extraoral diagnostic radiology (OPG, PA, BW, CBCT)
  • Examine the accuracy of the traditional endodontic tests (EPT, Cold Test, Heat Test)
  • Review the 4R operational diagnosis protocol and how it is used in differential diagnosis of different dental disease conditions.
  • Learn how to use the 4R Operational Diagnosis Protocol in the diagnosis and treatment planning of the followings:
    • Diagnosis of internal resorption problems
    • Diagnosis of external root resorption problems
    • Diagnosis of pulp disease problems:
      • Normal pulp
      • Reversible pulpitis
      • Symptomatic irreversible pulpitis
      • Asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis
      • Pulp necrosis
      • Pulp calcification
    • Periapical:
      • Symptomatic apical periodontitis
      • Asymptomatic apical periodontitis
      • Acute apical abscess
      • Chronic apical abscess
      • Condensing osteitis
    • Periradicular:
      • The isolated periodontal pocket diagnosis

Suggested Format: Full Day, Partial Day, Keynote; Lecture and Demonstration
Suggested Audience: General Practitioners

In 1964, Cameron introduced the cracked tooth syndrome diagnosis to the profession. 
 In 2018, the problem is more serious than it was in 1964. In general, knowledge on the subject of cracked teeth remains limited. There is more to the subject of cracked teeth than what you were taught in dental school.

In clinical practice, teeth presenting with line, fissure, and fracture cracks may each demand unique treatment plans; not every cracked tooth should be extracted. General practitioners need this information and these skills to be able to best diagnose and educate their patients, and to treat or refer them to appropriate specialist when indicated.

This course offers Dr. Abou-Rass’s groundbreaking expertise and career-spanning insight into the role of tooth structure crack (TSC) in the modern dental practice. In this session, attendees will learn how undiagnosed or misdiagnosed tooth cracks can affect or complicate endodontic, periodontic, or restorative treatment outcomes.

Dr. Abou-Rass approaches the diagnosis and treatment of tooth structure cracks according to his own 3×3 tooth structure crack classification system (anatomic, clinical, pathologic), the clinical application of which is covered in depth in this course, and explains the guiding principles, clinical and biological rationales for his treatment approach’s philosophy.

In addition to methods for and the importance of ruling out cracks before treatment planning, along with updated information about the etiologic role of abusive restorations, Dr. Abou-Rass also addresses the role of endodontic and post placement procedures in causing tooth structure cracks.

Learning Objectives

  • Define The 4R Operational Diagnosis Protocol in managing cracked teeth.
  • Describe how tooth structure cracks complicate and affect dental treatments.
  • Understand the definitions, classification, etiology and initiation mechanism of tooth structure cracks.
  • Use the 4R Operational Diagnosis Protocol in the differential diagnosis of many types of dental resorption commonly encountered in the dental practice.

Suggested Format:  Full Day, Partial Day, Keynote; Lecture and Demonstration
Suggested Audience: General Practitioners

Clinically, there are more than 12 types of root resorption. Although most dental resorption defects appear radiolucent at their advanced disease stages, they differ widely in etiology, histopathology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.

Most dental resorption problems are caused by dental treatments. Each dental specialty has its own encounter with the problem of resorption and found appropriate treatment and prevention methods. Unfortunately, such advanced specialty information is not taught to the dental student. A sampling of this information indicates that some of dental resorption pathologies lead to accelerated tooth loss and are best treated early and aggressively; some types of cervical resorption contraindicate endodontic treatment. How does the clinician distinguish? Dr. Abou-Rass sheds clinical light on the topic from the perspective of the critical complexities and necessity of accurate diagnosis.

Learning Objectives

  • Learn the use of the 4R Operational Diagnosis Protocol in the differential diagnosis of the different types of root resorption.
  • Learn the treatment-based classification of external root resorption.
  • Specify the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of the different types of external root resorption: Endodontic, orthodontic, periodontic, replantation, oral pathology, and multiple resorptions as manifestation of systemic problems

Suggested Format: Full Day, Partial Day, Keynote; Lecture and Demonstration
Suggested Audience: General Practitioners

Out of approximately 4,900 educational hours, dental students devote 60 hours of education (on average) to the study of practice management. American Dental Association (2014)

With only 1.2% of educational hours devoted to practice management, most dentists will ultimately make multiple economical and practice errors. This MASTERS course shares best practices and steps for implementation into your practice.

Learn the “Household Economics Model”, which applies established economic principles in dental practice management. Special emphasis will be placed on medical and paramedical staff hiring, training, and assignment to different roles within the office. We’ll review the best practices in human resources management, improving practice quality, increasing profitability, reducing risks, avoiding conflict and building staff relationships. Additionally, learn how to organize your back office for efficient function and supply/instrument control thereby reducing loss and waste and increasing productivity.

Learn techniques for better serving patients, being charitable, and investing in new technologies. Learn how to attract patients and deliver unforgettable service while assuring profitability. Explore how to create, manage and monitor systems for repeated success and put practice management principles to the test with hands-on activities and case studies.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the household economics concept and its use as a business model for dental practice success and sustainability.
  • Identify key performance indicators of land, physical, human, and service resources and how they can be used to evaluate the success of practice systems.
  • Examine the ideal dentist/dental assistant ratios.
  • Recognize best practices for dental assistant and auxiliary assignments and utilization in both the back and front offices.
  • Discover how to set up stock control systems within clinic and rooms.
  • Realize how to control waste and theft of materials and instruments in clinic.
  • Discuss how to establish dental service and procedures costs; calculate and reduce overhead.
  • Understand best practices in internal and external marketing.
  • Analyze best practices in increasing case presentation acceptance.
  • Learn dos and don’ts in monitoring staff and duties for cross checks and balances

Suggested Format: 1 or 2 Day, Partial Day, Keynote; Lecture, 
 Demonstration and/or Hands-On Training
Suggested Audience: Dentists and Practice Managers

Dr. Marwan Abou-Rass brings nearly 50 years of teaching cutting-edge innovations in the field of endodontic education. He has made significant new concepts and methodology contributions including:

  • The concept of teaching molar versus central teeth as the best sequence for learning endodontic skills
  • The critical error approach to evaluate clinical performance
  • Stressed Pulp Concept
  • Anti-Curvature Filing Method
  • 4R Operational Diagnosis Protocol
  • Composite Post and Core Buildup Protocol
  • Endodontic Treatment Finalization Protocol
  • Interim Endodontic Therapy for Native Bone Regeneration before Implant Placement
  • Designed complete set of endodontic microsurgical instruments for www.hu-friedy.com
  • Cracked Teeth Masterclass Series (15 hours continuing education webinar)

Dr. Abou-Rass holds a Master’s degree in Dental Science in Prosthodontics, a certificate in Endodontics and a PhD in Higher Education from the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Dr. Abou-Rass served as Endodontic Department Chairman and Director of the Advanced Endodontic program at the University of Southern California, School of Dentistry (1971-2000) and Director AEGD program at PAADI (2000-2012).

Currently he is USC Professor Emeritus, practicing endodontist and publisher of Dental Economics MENA Journal and CEMENAOnline.com. Visit www.abourass.com online to view details from Dr. Abou-Rass’ curriculum vitae.

International

  • 1st World Endodontic Congress
  • Asociaion Espanola de Endodoncia
  • Colegiofical, D’odontolegis estomatolegos, de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
  • Congress International de Odontoloxia de Ponta Grossa
  • Directorate of Health Affairs Holly Mecca
  • International Association of Gnathology (multiple)
  • International Congress of Iranian Dental Association
  • Iranian Dental Association (multiple)
  • Japan Dental Exchange Center (multiple)
  • Japan Post-Graduate Dental Association (multiple)
  • Jeddah, King Fahad General Hospital, Saudi Arabia (multiple)
  • King Faisal Specialty Hospital
  • Kuwait Dental Association (multiple)
  • La Association de Endodontia del D.F.
  • Lebanese University Staff
  • Pacific Dental Congress, Canada
  • Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital (multiple)
  • Riyadh Dental Center, Saudi Arabia (multiple)
  • RKH Dental Symposium (multiple)
  • Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland
  • Saudi Periodontal Club
  • Saudi Public Health Club
  • Sociedad Jalisciense de Endodontia A.C. VIII Reunion Regional
  • Southern Alberta Endodontic Society
  • Syrian Dental Association (multiple)

National

  • AADS
  • Academy of Excellence in General Dentistry
  • ADA Section of Fixed Prosthodontics
  • American Arab Dental Association (multiple)
  • American Association of Dental Schools
  • American Association of Endodontists (multiple)
  • American Prosthodontics Academy
  • Arab American Medical Association (multiple)
  • Association Gold Foil Clubs
  • C.D.A. Council on Scientific Affairs and Research (multiple)

State and Local

  • Alpha Omega Los Angeles Chapter
  • Alpha Omega, San Fernando Valley Chapter
  • California Association of Endodontists
  • California Dental Association (multiple)
  • Cuban Dental Society (multiple)
  • Downey Pedodontic Study Group
  • Ed Nutting San Diego Endodontic Seminar
  • Federation of California Dentists
  • Fresco Dental Society
  • Fresni Maderna Dental Foundation
  • Fresno Gnathological Study Group
  • Fresno Madera Dental Association
  • Glendale Academy of Dentistry (multiple)
  • Greater Kansas Dental Society
  • Indian Dental Association of California
  • Irving Gold Foil Study Group
  • Korean Dental Association
  • Newport Academy
  • Northern California Academy of Endodontics
  • Northern California Dental Society
  • Odontic Seminar (multiple)
  • Pasadena Academy of Dentistry
  • San Fernando Dental Hygiene Association
  • San Gabriel Valley Dental Hygiene Association
  • South Bay Academy
  • South Laguna Gnathological Research
  • Southern California Academy of Endodontics (multiple)
  • Stanislaus Dental Foundation (multiple)
  • The Coolidge Endodontic Study Club
  • Western Dental Group

Study Clubs/Societies

  • Altin American Dental Society
  • Aramco Dental Staff
  • Emirate Medical Association-Dental Society
  • Harbor Dental Society (multiple)
  • Italian Continuing Education Study Group (multiple)
  • Long Island Dental Society
  • Los Angeles Dental Society (multiple)
  • Mecca Dental Society
  • Monterey Bay Dental Society
  • Orange County Dental Society (multiple)
  • Orthodontic Study Club
  • Ralph Somer Study Club
  • Sacramento District Dental Society
  • San Diego County Dental Society
  • San Diego Endodontic Society
  • San Francisco Valley Dental Society
  • San Gabriel Valley Dental Society (multiple)
  • Santa Clara County Dental Society
  • Saudi Dental Society (multiple)
  • Stanislaus Dental Society
  • Stockton Dental Society
  • Thousand Oaks Dental Society
  • TriCounty Dental Society (multiple)
  • Western Dental Society (multiple)

Dental School Meetings

  • Advanced Endodontics Program, University of Oregon (multiple)
  • Beverly Hills Academy
  • Cypress College
  • Damascus University School of Dentistry
  • Forsyth Dental Research Center, Harvard University
  • Islamic Azad University Dental Center
  • Loma Linda University (multiple)
  • Louisiana State University
  • UCLA School of Dentistry (multiple)
  • University of Bologna, School of Dentistry
  • University of British Columbia, Vancouver (multiple)
  • University of California, San Francisco (multiple)
  • University of California, San Diego (multiple)
  • University of Jordan
  • University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
  • University of Nebraska
  • University of Tokyo, Tokyo Dental College
  • USC Advanced Dental Residency Program
  • USC Annual Hawaii Dental Conference (multiple)
  • USC Composite Resin Study Club
  • USC Endodontic Study Group
  • USC School of Dentistry (multiple)
  • USC Symposium (multiple)
  • Wilshire Academy of Dentistry (multiple)

 

Other

  • Atrix Corporation
  • Block Drug Corporation staff
  • First Healthcare Training Symposium (multiple)
  • Gulf Information Technology Expo
  • Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital
  • Military Health Science Academy
  • Ministry of Health (multiple)
  • U.S. Army Headquarters, Heidelberg, West Germany
Why choose Dr. Abou-Rass?
  • Dr. Abou-Rass holds a Master’s degree in Dental Science in Prosthodontics, a certificate in Endodontics and a PhD in Higher Education from the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  • Dr. Abou-Rass served as Endodontic Department Chairman and Director of the Advanced Endodontic program at the University of Southern California, School of Dentistry (1971-2000) and Director AEGD program at PAADI (2000-2012).
  • Currently Dr. Abou-Rass is USC Professor Emeritus, practicing endodontist and publisher of Dental Economics MENA Journal and CEMENAOnline.com.

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Marwan Abou-Rass, SpeakerMarwan Abou-Rass, dental speaker