casey hein dental speaker

Casey Hein & Associates
PO Box 4637
Hagerstown, MD 21742

240-707-6766

Casey@CaseyHein.com 
CaseyHein.com


TOPICS:

  • Periodontics
  • Oral Systemic Connection
  • Health and Wellness
  • Medical-Dental Collaboration

Casey Hein, BSDH, RDH, MBA

The time is now for medical-dental collaboration targeting periodontal disease and systemic diseases and conditions. But how do dentists and hygienists do this?

The evidence is clear; overall health is compromised by infection and inflammation within the oral cavity. Periodontal disease is perhaps the greatest contributor to this threat.

  • What do you say to patients and how does this effect treatment planning?
  • How do you collaborate with the medical community?
  • How should this evidence impact practice philosophies and systems?

Casey is considered the premier thought-leader in implementing periodontal-systemic science. With new models of care and dental-medical collaboration that practitioners can implement immediately, Casey’s programs empower the whole dental team to progressively incorporate the science of periodontal-systemic interrelationships into everyday patient care.

Audiences benefit from Casey’s many years of clinical consulting, research, participation on scientific boards and in consensus groups, and experience in building an environment for medical-dental collaboration at the University of Manitoba. Utilizing evidence-based information, sophisticated animations, case studies and storytelling of professional experiences, Casey’s programs facilitate greater understanding, stimulate ideas, fuel lively discussion and empower participants.


  • In the realm of periodontal-systemic links – what’s real and what’s hype?
  • Can you explain to patients the significance of periodontal disease and why it’s so important to treat it?
  • How can you collaborate with medical and nursing professionals to care for patients who have periodontal disease?

Several decades of scientific inquiry have produced evidence that periodontal disease may increase risk for a number of inflammatory diseases and conditions: coronary artery disease and stroke, diabetes and its complications, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and pneumonia, among others.

Dentists and hygienists are well positioned to counsel, screen, and appropriately refer patients who are at risk for chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Likewise, physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, and other non-dental healthcare providers have an important role to play in screening and appropriately referring patients at risk for periodontal disease. This course will empower dental and medical practitioners to integrate periodontal-systemic science into everyday patient care with ease and confidence. The program also provides a template for jump-starting cross-disciplinary healthcare collaboration and helps the dental team reframe the “check-up” and “cleaning” appointment.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the significance of periodontal infection in amplifying systemic inflammation
  • Implement a new model of risk assessment that focuses on the patient’s cumulative inflammatory burden
  • Screen and appropriately refer patients at risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes
  • Implement protocols for monitoring glycemic control in patients with diabetes or prediabetes
  • Summarize clearly and simply, in patient-friendly language, the science behind periodontal-systemic interrelationships
  • Build collaborative relationships with physicians, nurses and other non-dental healthcare professionals
  • Implement bi-lateral point-of-care screening and referral for periodontal diseases and associated chronic diseases
  • Identify barriers to implementing periodontal-systemic science into everyday patient care

Suggested Format: Full Day Session or 4 hour program
Suggested Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

  • Are you underdiagnosing or waiting too long to diagnose periodontal disease?
  • What can you say to patients about periodontal-systemic links that is grounded in scientific evidence?
  • How do you increase your patients’ acceptance of periodontal treatment?

In the past quarter-century, there have been major advances in understanding the role of periodontal infection and inflammation in the risk for systemic diseases, including coronary artery disease and stroke, diabetes, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and pneumonia, among others. This course explores the significance of periodontal infection in increasing systemic inflammation, and provides overviews of the biological mechanisms that link periodontal disease to a constellation of inflammatory driven diseases and conditions. This body of evidence provides a compelling case for early intervention of periodontal disease. Casey also suggests a number of hurdles and conditioned assumptions that hijack diagnosis of periodontal disease and patient acceptance of proposed treatment, with recommendations on how to overcome these challenges.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the biological mechanisms implicated in the inflammatory pathway linking periodontal disease to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, complications of pregnancy, pneumonia and other links under investigation
  • Identify patients in the earliest stages of periodontal disease
  • Identify the hurdles and conditioned assumptions that hijack the diagnosis of periodontal disease

Suggested Length: 3 hours
Suggested Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

  • Why the dental care needs of diabetic patients are different from those patients who do not have diabetes, and what specific clinical protocols should you implement?
  • Do you wish you had evidence-based messages to help you discuss the importance of glycemic control with patients who have periodontal disease and diabetes or prediabetes?
  • How can you collaborate with physicians, nurses and diabetes educators to care for patients who have diabetes or prediabetes?

Worldwide, an estimated 390 million people have diabetes—and that number keeps growing. This patient population has specialized needs when it comes to periodontal care. Treating diabetic patients is different than nondiabetic patients. To ensure optimal health outcomes, patients with diabetes and periodontal disease require collaborative case management.

This course provides an empowering vision for dentists and dental hygienists in screening for diabetes, pre-diabetes, obesity, and Metabolic Syndrome and offers practical ideas for jumpstarting collaborative case management with the medical community.

If your team is still treating patients who have diabetes the same way you treat patients without diabetes, this course is a must. Course participants will develop greater confidence in caring for diabetic patients and establish easily implementable clinical protocols to better address the needs of patients with diabetes.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the biological link between diabetes and periodontal disease
  • Incorporate evidence-based information on the interrelationship between diabetes and periodontal disease into everyday dentistry
  • Monitor and document glycemic control in diabetic patients who have periodontal disease (or diabetic patients who may be at risk for periodontal disease)
  • Identify patients who may be at risk for Metabolic Syndrome
  • Build collaborative relationships with physicians, nurses, and other non-dental healthcare professionals to cross-screen and cross-refer patients at risk for diabetes, prediabetes and periodontal disease
  • Communicate evidence-based messages to patients about the interrelationship between diabetes and periodontal disease
  • Implement clinical protocols specific to the care of patients with diabetes

Suggested Length: 3-4 hours
Suggested Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

How much do you know about the link between metabolic syndrome, obesity, inflammation, and periodontal disease? Why can’t dentists and dental hygienists overlook overweight and obesity in everyday patient care? How do you start difficult conversations about weight loss with overweight patients?

Obesity, as we hear almost every day, is taking a devastating toll on human health and wellness. In fact, it may be the single greatest threat to global health. Worldwide, the prevalence of obesity has more than doubled since 1980, and projections suggest that 1.2 billion people will be obese by 2030.

As strong predictors of comorbidity, obesity and Metabolic Syndrome can no longer be ignored in everyday patient care. Recent studies have proposed a correlation between obesity and periodontal disease; numerous investigations have also suggested an interrelationship between Metabolic Syndrome and periodontal disease.

This energizing, revelatory course empowers the dental team to identify patients at risk for overweight and obesity, overcome the difficulty in discussing weight, build collaboration with the medical community to cross-screen and cross-refer patients at risk for obesity and periodontal disease, and educate dental patients about the role of obesity in increasing risk for periodontal disease.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the biological mechanism that is theorized to link obesity and Metabolic Syndrome to periodontal disease
  • Describe the concept of cumulative inflammatory burden
  • Identify dental patients who are overweight or obese
  • Recognize patients who may be ‘inflammatory-primed’
  • Overcome the difficulty in discussing weight with patients
  • Educate patients about the impact of overweight and obesity on periodontal health
  • Identify patients who might benefit from referral to physicians and specialists for weight management
  • Implement clinical considerations in caring for obese dental patients
  • Build collaboration with the medical community to cross-screen and crossrefer patients at risk for obesity and periodontal disease

Suggested Length: 3-4 hours
Suggested Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

  • What is the most recent evidence regarding pregnancy and periodontal disease, and what should dental teams be doing with this information?
  • Do you wish you had evidence-based, sensitive messages to help you discuss with women the risk periodontal disease may pose to healthy pregnancy?
  • How can you educate and train physicians, nurses, and midwives to screen pregnant women for periodontal disease and refer suspected cases for dental care?

It is well recognized that infection and inflammation is associated with a significant proportion of adverse pregnancy outcomes, and one of the most common sources of infection and inflammation is periodontitis. It’s been estimated that periodontal diseases, including gingivitis, affect 75% of pregnant women.

Periodontal infection has been correlated with such pregnancy complications as preterm birth, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and delivery of small-for-gestational age infants.

Oral healthcare providers who care for women of child-bearing age should be aware of the evidence that supports the possibility that periodontal infection may be a modifiable risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

This case-based course empowers oral healthcare providers to incorporate into everyday patient care evidence of the relationship between periodontal disease and risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Learning Objectives

  • Explain how the structure and integrity of gingival tissues change during pregnancy
  • Describe the evidence supporting a relationship between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes
  • Cite the risk factors for preterm birth and preeclampsia
  • Express patient-appropriate messages to educate women of child-bearing age about the importance of oral health and the potential impact of periodontal disease on pregnancy
  • Summarize the findings of various consensus opinions related to the oral healthcare of pregnant women
  • Identify pregnant women who have oral health problems that may place them at greater risk for an adverse pregnancy outcome and communicate concerns to the patient’s physician
  • Educate and train physicians, nurses, and midwives to screen pregnant women for periodontal disease and refer suspected cases for dental care

Suggested Length: 3-4 hours
Suggested Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

  • Does periodontal disease really increase the risk of heart attack?
  • Is there something you should do differently for patients who have (or are at risk for) cardiovascular disease?
  • How can you collaborate with physicians, nurses and diabetes educators to care for patients who have or who may be at risk for cardiovascular disease?

Since groundbreaking research on the potential connection between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD) appeared in 1989 (Mattila), there has been a plethora of publications about this subject in many prestigious medical journals. Explanations on the biological mechanisms by which periodontal disease could cause systemic inflammation, promote atherogeneis, and increase the risk for myocardial infarction and stroke are wellfounded. Although short-term studies suggest that treatment of periodontal disease can reduce systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, evidence that periodontal therapy can prevent atherosclerosis, heart attacks or stroke is lacking. What are dentists and dental hygienists to do with this inconsistent information?

This course helps oral healthcare professionals to make sense of the research and consensus opinions on the links between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease. The program empowers participants to incorporate the latest evidence on the relationship of periodontal and CVD, screen patients to identify those who may be at risk for CVD, and build collaborative relationships with non-dental healthcare providers to increase point-of-care screening and cross referral of patients at risk for CVD and periodontal disease.

Learning Objectives

  • Recognize the significance of cumulative inflammatory burden
  • Discuss the relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis and periodontitis as a modifiable risk factor for heart disease and ischemic stroke
  • Accurately articulate the risk periodontal disease may pose in the development and progression of atherosclerosis
  • Identify patients at risk for cardiovascular disease
  • Articulate key messages for educating patients about the relationship between periodontal disease and CVD
  • Implement strategies for medical-dental collaboration in caring for patients at risk for periodontal disease and atherosclerosis
  • Articulate the findings of various consensus opinions related to clinical application of evidence of the association between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis

Suggested Length: 3-4 hours
Suggested Audience: Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, business staff

  • What is the magnitude of the unmet needs for dental care in older populations – how are we ‘dropping the ball’ on caring for this high-risk group?
  • How might untreated periodontal disease predispose nursing home residents to lifethreatening diseases?
  • How can all healthcare providers—including dental professionals—contribute to the well-being of nursing home residents through screenings and treatments for oral-systemic issues?

In the past several decades, medical and nursing communities have seen a wealth of scientific evidence that supports the important role of oral health in sustaining overall health and well-being. But we have been slow to adopt standards for collaborative care between medicine and dentistry to implement this science.

Given the prevalence of periodontal disease and caries in older populations (most of which goes undiagnosed), it is reasonable to assume that most people entering nursing homes have untreated periodontal disease and decayed teeth.

Poor oral health places older adults at greater risk for malnutrition. Furthermore, periodontal disease increases the risk for inflammatory-driven diseases such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, aspiration pneumonia, complications of diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. These diseases are the most prevalent in nursing homes and are costly to treat.

This course proposes protocols for nursing homes that fosters a collaborative practice arrangement between nurses and dental hygienists.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the unmet needs for dental care in older populations, the prevalence of periodontal disease and caries in this at-risk group and how these oral diseases compromise the health of older adults
  • Implement bi-lateral, point-of-care screening and referral of older people with dental diseases, and related inflammatory-driven diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes
  • Describe how nurse-dental hygienist transdisciplinary collaboration could improve health outcomes in nursing home residents

Suggested Length: 2-3 hours
Suggested Audience: Dental hygienists, dentists, nurses, physicians, and other nondental healthcare providers

Casey Hein first began speaking about periodontal-systemic links in 2003, when this body of science was emerging. Since that time, evidence of the role of periodontal disease in amplifying systemic inflammation and increasing the risk for chronic diseases has strengthened. Yet, clinicians are not quite certain how to integrate this information into everyday patient care.

Casey’s programs present new models of care and collaboration that practitioners can implement immediately. They are the result of many years of clinical consulting, research, participation on scientific boards and in consensus groups, and her experience in building an environment for medicaldental collaboration at the University of Manitoba.

Utilizing sophisticated animations, case studies and storytelling of professional experiences, her programs facilitate greater understanding of periodontal-systemic links, stimulate ideas, fuel lively discussions and empower participants.

Casey is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Periodontics and Director of Education of the International Centre for Oral-Systemic Health in the College of Dentistry; and the Director of Continuing Professional Development for Dentistry and Dental Hygiene, in the Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, at the University of Manitoba (Canada). She is also an internationally recognized speaker and published author, a consultant to the dental industry, advisory/scientific boards, professional associations, and a reviewer for scientific publications. She has developed two educational websites that provide resources for implementation of periodontal-systemic science and online courses related to oral-systemic health for both the dental and medical communities.

National Organizations
Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry
Academy of General Dentistry
American Academy of Oral-Systemic Health
American Dental Association
American Dental Education Association
American Dental Hygienists Association (multiple)
Invisalign General Practitioner Summit
North American Dental Hygiene Research Conference

Regional, State and Local Meetings
Albuquerque District Dental Society
Allegany/Garret Dental Society (multiple)
Anne Arundel County Dental Society
Arizona Dental Association Western Regional Dental Convention
Baltimore Innovative Dental Seminars
Big Apple Dental Meeting
Cleveland Dental Hygienists’ Association
Delaware State Dental Society
El Paso Dental Conference
Governor’s Oral Health Council
Greater Baltimore Dental Hygienist’s Association
Greater Delaware Valley Dental Hygiene Conference
Greater Houston Dental Hygienists’ Society
Greater Richmond Dental Hygienists’ Association
Greater St. Louis Dental Hygiene Society
Holiday Dental Conference
Howard County Dental Hygienists’ Association
Illinois State Dental Hygienists’ Association
Mid County Dental Society
Mississippi Dental Hygienists’ Association
Mobile Area Dental Society
Nation’s Capitol Meeting
New Mexico Academy of General Dentistry
New Mexico Dental Association
New Mexico Dental Hygienists’ Association
North Dakota Dental Hygienists’ Association
Northern Virginia Dental Hygienists’ Association
Ohio Dental Hygienists’ Association
Oklahoma Dental Hygienists’ Association
Oklahoma Society of Periodontists
Oregon Dental Hygienists’ Association
Rocky Mountain Dental Conference
Southwest District Dental Society
Spirit of Michigan Meeting; Michigan Dental Association
Star of the North Meeting, Minnesota Dental Association
Texas Dental Association
Under One Roof
Virginia Dental Association
Virginia Public Health Dentist Conference
Wisconsin Dental Hygienists’ Association
Yankee Dental Congress

Dental Study Clubs
Adelaide Seattle Study Club
Bunting Study Club
Central Texas Study Club
Greater Lafayette Study Club
Heartland Study Club
New Horizons Hygiene Study Club
Palo Alto Study Club
Port City Study Club
Prime Study Club
Roanoke Seattle Study Club
Seattle Study Club National Symposium and Clubs
Somerset Study Club
South Ohio Seattle Study Club
St. Helen’s Shadow Study Club
Upstate Study Club

International
Canadian Association of Public Health Dentistry
Dalhousie University; Halifax, NS Canada
Journees Dentaires Internationales du Québec
Melbourne Seattle Study Club
Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons South Australia Branch
University of Adelaide, School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health Sciences; South Australia

Dental Schools
Allegany College of Maryland
Finger Lakes Center for Advanced Dentistry
Indiana University School of Dentistry
Old Dominion University’s Gene W. Hirschfield School of Dental Hygiene
University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine
University of Missouri – Kansas City School of Dentistry
Midwest Dental Conference
Monroe Community College
Montgomery County Community College
New Mexico Association of Community Colleges
Springfield Technical Community College
State University of New York (SUNY), University at Buffalo
University of Pittsburgh
University of the Pacific

Other Medical
Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service
Allegany Health Right
American Association of Diabetes Educators
College of Nursing, University of Tennessee
LeHigh Valley Health Network
New Mexico Department of Health
New Mexico Health Policy Commission
New Mexico Human Services Department
New Mexico Medical Society
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Western Maryland AHEC
Western Maryland Regional Medical Center (multiple)

“Casey sure knows how to pack a room—we had one of the highest attendance.”

—Heather Knitter, RDH; Greater Houston Dental Hygienist’s Society


“Our office took a lot away from your presentation. We are enthused and ready to make some changes…you are truly inspiring and just what I needed after 26 years of hygiene practice. I still enjoy my career and the scientific information you provided will assist me in providing the best possible care and education I can provide my patients.”

—Julie Grieco, RDH; Watertown, New York


“I came to hear Casey because of her professionalism and knowledge displayed by her case study presentations. Best perio course I’ve ever attended (in 20 years).”

—Debra Fiacchi-Hudak, RDH; Hadley, MA


“We just had Casey Hein RDH present at our annual session and she was fabulous! It was a true pleasure to give her a glowing recommendation. We thank her again for her wonderful presentations.”

—Paula Todd; Convention Manager; Western Regional Dental Convention


“Loved it! Casey helped me to get motivated after 2 kids and parttime in the last 6 years. She fired me up – thanks.”

—Jana Mathes, RDH; Dodge City, KS


“This was the best CE I’ve ever been to! This is the direction we need to ahead.”

—Barbara A. Ruiz, RDH; Choctaw, OK


“Loved how Casey presented this information- she spoke at my level.”

—Karla Bredemeyer, RDH; Noblesville, Indiana


“Casey is very down to earth, real, not school fake ideal. Thank you for the challenge.”

—Karen Beckstrom; Shawnee, KS


“One of the best CE courses in a long time.”

—Kimberly Allen, RDH; Lanton, OK


“Thank you for an excellent program…your lecture was very comprehensive and professional; the critiques were very positive. Thanks for coming to Indianapolis.”

—Kristi Dobson, Certified Meeting Professional; Indiana University School of Dentistry


“Casey delivers a fresh, new look at the profession we have chosen. Casey redefines clinical treatment modalities and guides the participant to take ownership of their education, utilizing new evidence based research to fully understand concepts such as host susceptibility, risk assessment, and looking beyond mere pocket depths-treating the entire health of the patient. Thee participant is challenged to take this information and utilize it in their practice-modifying not only the way treatment planning is implemented, but innovative ways to educate patients and improve the success of the periodontal therapist. A very sincere and warm thank you from Oregon.”

—Lori Aus, BA, RDH; Oregon Dental Hygienist’s Association, Professional Development Chair

Why choose Casey?
  • Highly respected speaker of hundreds of national and international presentations at major dental meetings, national, state, and local professional associations, governmental and insurance agencies, Seattle Study Clubs, and universities
  • Well recognized author with hundreds of publications including scientific and professional journals, consensus reports, white papers, and textbook chapters
  • Founder of the first publication on oral-systemic medicine: Grand Rounds in Oral-Systemic Medicine. This quarterly journal was a PennWell publication with an industry-wide distribution
  • Pioneer in and advocate for incorporating periodontal-systemic links into everyday patient care in both medicine and dentistry
  • Creator and author of an oral-systemic health curriculum for physicians, nurses and other non-dental healthcare providers (www.oralhealthed.com)
  • Credited as a visionary in establishing models for dental-medical collaboration in oral health care
  • A seasoned professor and trainer, Casey utilizes adult learning concepts to engage all learners and ensure results
  • As both a practical clinician and owner of a consulting business, Casey has experience resolving the day-to-day challenges experienced in dental practices

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Casey Hein, dental speakerCasey Hein, dental speaker